Ancient Word of the Day: Khemeia

Khemeia: The extraction of juices for medicine, from Ancient Greek Related to the word Khumos meaning plant juice. This word khemeia travelled from Greece to the Medieval Arabic world where it came to mean al-khemeia or alchemy. The goal of alchemists was to bring a mystical fifth element known as the ‘quintessence’ from the divineContinue reading “Ancient Word of the Day: Khemeia”

Ancient Word of the Day: Emacitus

Emacitus: The desire to buy things from Latin. The English version of this word ‘Emacity’ fell out of use at the beginning of the 20th Century. This was replaced by less beautiful terms to describe the same thing, such as shopaholic, consumerism and retail therapy. Emacitus derives from the even older Proto-Indo-European word Em YouContinue reading “Ancient Word of the Day: Emacitus”

Ancient Word of the Day: Dam

Dam: To Tame or domesticate from Proto-Indo-European Other words that originate from Dam are: Domesticate: Hunter gatherer tribes needed to be able to trust dogs to watch out for bears, wolves and other carnivores. They had to be safe to keep around children and become domesticated. Tame: The first wolves were domesticated and made tameContinue reading “Ancient Word of the Day: Dam”

10 Interesting Things I Found on the Internet #34

It’s been a long time baby. Perhaps you have been pining for this little buttery pastry of uplifting sugary goodness. I haven’t forgotten about you, I’ve been baking away in the oven for ages. So here it is…straight out of the oven for you… Celestially divine embroidery by Ophelie Trichereau Find her work on PatreonContinue reading “10 Interesting Things I Found on the Internet #34”

Ancient Word of the Day: Bhleu

Bhleu: ‘To Blow or to swell’ from Proto-Indo-European Life flows and leaves, wind, clouds, fire and storms bhleu/blow. From this ancient word comes many other beautiful nature words we know and love today, such as: Blossoms Bulbs Bellows Blast Bleat Belly Bells Ball Balloon Bladder Blót, an ancient Norse rite of blood sacrifice, also derivedContinue reading “Ancient Word of the Day: Bhleu”

Ancient Word of the Day: An

An: ‘To breath’ from Proto-Indo-European If you empty your lungs you make an AHHHH sound on the exhale. The Proto-Indo-European word for this onomatopoeic sound is An. The word an remains the same in Anglo-Saxon, Old English, Icelandic, Swedish and Dutch. The ancient sound of an even exists within the word Human and Anmal. AfterContinue reading “Ancient Word of the Day: An”

Ancient Word of the Day: Darth Vader

Fans speculate that the name Darth Vader means ‘Dark Father’ are in for a rude awakening. The real meaning of Darth Vader is actually way cooler than that. George Lucas, the creator of the Star Wars franchise has (according to online sources) explained that the name Darth Vader comes from ‘Darth’ (Dark Lord of theContinue reading “Ancient Word of the Day: Darth Vader”

Ancient Word of the Day: Serendipitist

Serendipitist: n. A person who benefits from a chance or serendipitous event Serendipity: happenchance or providence. This beautiful term was originally coined by writer Horace Walpole in 1754. Walpole was inspired by the ancient Persian tale The Three Princes of Serendip, about some titular characters who ran around in ancient Persia having some marvellous luckContinue reading “Ancient Word of the Day: Serendipitist”

10 Cool Things I Found On the Internet: Christmas 2020 Edition

It has been a weird year 😕 I hope wherever you are, Yule gives you a moment to pause, reflect and eat something nice. May the gods bless you and those you love this Yule. Santa invoking the dancing imps of hell Ring the Bells by Jessica Marie Baumgartner So right now I want toContinue reading “10 Cool Things I Found On the Internet: Christmas 2020 Edition”

Ancient Word of the Day: Stravaig

Stravaig: v. to wander or amble without a purpose or destination in mind. Glad of the opportunity to explore and discover on foot, being unconstrained by time. (from Scots Gaelic) Stravaig derives from eighteenth-century Scots extravage, meaning ‘wander about; digress, ramble in speech’, in turn derived from Medieval Latin extravagari ‘wander, stray beyond limits’. Stravaig, in various forms, is foundContinue reading “Ancient Word of the Day: Stravaig”