natural history

Reave

A long and low boundary wall or bank, found especially on Dartmoor and in Devon, mostly now sunk back into the landscape. Also, as a verb, to tear, split, divide or cleave. [caption id="attachment_171626" align="aligncenter" width="778"]Celestial ceilings and soaring skies in Poland Inside of the walls of Wawel Castle, we watch the gigantic strawberry moon rise on Midsummer's Eve 2016 and see the ballet in the castle . Copyright Content Catnip 2015[/caption]

Rof/rifa

An Icelandic word meaning to rip or tear something. Rof á landi refers to the rupture of the top soils of the land or erosion, [caption id="attachment_179090" align="aligncenter" width="1080"]Adventures on the Forth and Clyde Canal A canal bridge over a road in Edinburgh. Copyright Content Catnip 2010[/caption]

Reave

To take away life, rest or sight. From the Oxford English Dictionary.
Or art thou bent against thy loyal lord, To reave his life that gives thee life and breath? - The Cobbler’s Prophecy, 1594 (sig. E3v).

The sky puts on the darkening blue coat held for it by a row of ancient trees; you watch: and the lands grow distant in your sight, one journeying to heaven, one that falls;

and leave you, not at home in either one, not quite so still and dark as the darkened houses, not calling to eternity with the passion of what becomes a star each night, and rises;

and leave you (inexpressibly to unravel) your life, with its immensity and fear, so that, now bounded, now immeasurable, it is alternately stone in you and star.

Rainer Maria Rilke, Poet, austria. 1875-1926. 

[caption id="attachment_168051" align="aligncenter" width="1080"]Every Picture Tells A Story: The Gloaming on the Isle of Skye Portree Harbour, Isle of Skye Scotland. Copyright Content Catnip 2010[/caption]