10 Interesting Things I Found on the Internet #40

Yo-ho-ho and a mug of (forest-destroying) NesQuick. Come one, come all to another kooky edition of 10 interesting contraptions that can barely be defined as real. These things were collected on the rear hub-cap of my car as I drove from one side of the country to the other – I hope you like them!Continue reading “10 Interesting Things I Found on the Internet #40”

10 Interesting Things I Found on the Internet #39

Yo-Ho-Ho and a bottle of atomic juice, welcome to another weird and wobbly edition of 10 Interesting Things, where anything can happen and anyone extinct or extant can be reanimated on the full moon and then thrust into the limelight for a microsecond. Little timber kids are frozen in time Via Twitter A Newfoundland namedContinue reading “10 Interesting Things I Found on the Internet #39”

Mana Wahine: The Female Moko in Māori Culture

Tā moko represents a woman’s mana (status or power) and her whakapapa (ancestry and forebears) in society. This is best highlighted by the time when the chiefs signed the Treaty of Waitangi with their mokos in 1840. The Moko Kauae is a chin tattoo traditional reserved for Māori women with mana (high status and power) and olderContinue reading “Mana Wahine: The Female Moko in Māori Culture”

10 Interesting Things I Found on the Internet #38

Yo-Ho-Ho and a bottle of activated almond milk with added full moon energy. Haere Mai and welcome to another edition to 10 Interesting Things, a collection of ragamuffin and rebellious things from the good ole’ webs that can’t really be neatly categorised. I hope you enjoy. Van Gogh’s Starry Night as Lego With thanks toContinue reading “10 Interesting Things I Found on the Internet #38”

The Māori legend of two sisters Rehutai and Tangimoana

This painting by Bronwyn Waipuka illustrates a story by Wairarapa kaumātua (elder) Mita Carter. Rehutai and Tangimoana were beautiful twin sisters who lived on the banks of the Ruamāhanga River. They both fell in love with Rautoroa, a handsome warrior, but he could not decide which to marry. Rehutai asked Tangimoana to fetch some water from aContinue reading “The Māori legend of two sisters Rehutai and Tangimoana”

The Māori legend of Pania: Kaitiaki and taniwha of the reef, retold as street art

Pania is the legendary Kaitiaki (guardian/protector) of the reef in local Maori legend and her wairua (spirit) is connected strongly to the moana (ocean) close by to the town of Napier. Legend has it that Pania was a shimmering and iridescently beautiful maiden who lives in the sea and following a human encounter and a brokenContinue reading “The Māori legend of Pania: Kaitiaki and taniwha of the reef, retold as street art”

Otherworldly and Abandoned Soviet Monuments

These sculptures and old buildings before the end of the Cold War era look futuristic and strange. Some structures demonstrate the military might of Russia. While others are scintillating, harshly modern, and located in beautiful forested landscapes. These monuments are artistic and architectural wonders. Could these lost and forgotten objects ever be revived and resurrected, albeitContinue reading “Otherworldly and Abandoned Soviet Monuments”

Celestial ceilings and soaring skies in Poland

Poland in the summer is filled with enveloping sunlight, as bright and life affirming as a hug. Vibrant life, bees and flies take a circuitous route through fields of barley, poppies and wheat in the countryside. The air filled with drifting dandelion and pollen. A cacophany of bird song fills the countryside accompanied by aContinue reading “Celestial ceilings and soaring skies in Poland”

Beautiful maps & beautiful Welsh tales: The Mabinogion

The Mabinogion is a magical and mythical Celtic classic from the  thirteenth century or earlier. It’s thoroughly Welsh and is considered a masterpiece of medieval literature. Although written down during the middle ages, experts think these stories may date from the dawn of Celtic civilisation in Britain. The Mabinogion has given rise to all ofContinue reading “Beautiful maps & beautiful Welsh tales: The Mabinogion”

History: You are what you do – olden times  tradespeople and their tools

Hieroglyphics, circa 1800 This delightful print entitled Hieroglyphics dates from circa 1800 and was created by the London-based publisher Samuel William Fores in the aquatint style. We can see the composite portraits of four professions: a florist, writer, musician, and barber — their features made up entirely from the tools of their trades. Such compositeContinue reading “History: You are what you do – olden times  tradespeople and their tools”