Ancient Word of the Day

Ancient Word of the Day

Words dredged up from the pelagic zone of language


Ancient word of the day: Celandine

Ancient word of the day: Celandine

This pretty yellow star-like flower is from the buttercup family. It is common to see it flourishing at the beginning of spring in new grasses, hedges and in at the banks of rivers. It blankets forest floors. Commonly thought of as being a weed, it is still absolutely beautiful to behold.

Ancient Word of the Day: Serendipitist

Ancient Word of the Day: Serendipitist

Serendipitist: n. A person who benefits from a chance or serendipitous event Serendipity: happenchance or providence. This beautiful term was originally coined by writer Horace Walpole in 1754. Walpole was inspired by the ancient Persian tale The Three Princes of Serendip, about some titular characters who ran around in ancient Persia having some marvellous luckContinue reading “Ancient Word of the Day: Serendipitist”

Ancient Word of the Day: Stravaig

Ancient Word of the Day: Stravaig

Stravaig: v. to wander or amble without a purpose or destination in mind. Glad of the opportunity to explore and discover on foot, being unconstrained by time. (from Scots Gaelic) Stravaig derives from eighteenth-century Scots extravage, meaning ‘wander about; digress, ramble in speech’, in turn derived from Medieval Latin extravagari ‘wander, stray beyond limits’. Stravaig, in various forms, is foundContinue reading “Ancient Word of the Day: Stravaig”

Ancient Word of the Day: Cuneiform

Ancient Word of the Day: Cuneiform

Cuneiform: n. The oldest known writing system that originated in Mesopotamia circa 3400BC. It was etched onto wet clay tablets using a wedge-shaped stylus. Cuneiform is the original ancient written language that underpins all modern forms of written communication. Many languages throughout a vast geographical span over thousands of years were written in cuneiform, includingContinue reading “Ancient Word of the Day: Cuneiform”

Ancient Word of the Day: Anglii

Ancient Words of the Day: Anglii/Angle/Ankle

One of the oldest English words recorded is Anglii used first in the year 98 AD by Roman historian Gaius Cornelius Tacitus (ca. 56-120 AD) Anglii i.e “the Angles,” literally “people of Angul” (Old Norse Öngull). Tacitus wrote in 98AD in his book ‘Germania’ about the various Teutonic tribes he came into contact with includingContinue reading “Ancient Words of the Day: Anglii/Angle/Ankle”

Hauntingly relevant ancient Mesoptamian Proverbs about love and friendship

Hauntingly relevant ancient Mesoptamian Proverbs about love and friendship

A mere friend will agree with you, but a real friend will argue. ~ Assyrian Proverb Tell me your friends, and I’ll tell you who you are. ~ Assyrian Proverb Friendship is for the day of trouble, posterity for the future. ~ Babylonian Proverb What comes from the heart is known by the heart. ~Continue reading “Hauntingly relevant ancient Mesoptamian Proverbs about love and friendship”

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