Comforting Thought: We should allow ourselves to receive love and care from others

Paradoxically, letting go sometimes means allowing ourselves to receive love and care from others. Our can-do culture has made many of us believe that we should always be self-sufficient. Somewhere along the way we also get the message that asking for help is a sign of weakness. We often forget that we’re interdependent creatures whoseContinue reading “Comforting Thought: We should allow ourselves to receive love and care from others”

Comforting Thought: Regard yourself as a cloud

“Regard yourself as a cloud in the flesh; because, you see, clouds never make mistakes. Then through this capacity you will develop a kind of confidence … you will be able to trust your own intuition.” Alan Watts

Comforting Thought: Rough Diamonds

Abandoned sites and places that are not aesthetically pleasing can teach us a more sophisticated way of looking at the natural environment, not in terms of the picturesque, or even the care of which it has been tended, but with an eye upon ecological virility.

Comforting Thought: A traumatic childhood may actually make you more conscious, complex and understanding of others

Dr Elaine Aron in her research looking at Highly Sensitive People (HSPs) found that they are generally more affected by traumatic childhoods and that they are more depressed and anxious as adults. However, there is a big hopeful caveat with this finding – the HSP has all of the emotional tools and understanding of selfContinue reading “Comforting Thought: A traumatic childhood may actually make you more conscious, complex and understanding of others”

Comforting Thought: Keeping Together in Time

As I have always know intuitively: movement, dance and physicality of our bodies is the key to unlocking connection with other people and our connection to our inner feelings and true self. This was an incredibly powerful insight from ‘The Body Keeps the Score.’ This is why yoga feels good, cycling feels good, sex feelsContinue reading “Comforting Thought: Keeping Together in Time”

Comforting Thought: Soft Fascination

We pay attention differently when we are in nature. This is called ‘soft fascination’ The great 19th century thinker William James (brother of novelist Henry James) proposed that there are two ways of paying attention. The first is voluntary and directed, which is used for tasks that demand concentration. For example doing work, walking alongContinue reading “Comforting Thought: Soft Fascination”

Comforting Thought: The interconnectedness of all living things

Everything in its right place One feels keenly the sense of interconnectedness of all living things: a sense of everything being in its right place. This is biology as teleology, rainforest as pocketwatch fallen open on the path- but instead of the hand of God crafting its workings, coevolution is the force by which theContinue reading “Comforting Thought: The interconnectedness of all living things”

Comforting Thought: Introverts mature more gracefully than extroverts

Some extraverted people can avoid being introverted and turning inwards, for years at a time. Later in life, self-reflection becomes important for everyone. In short, introverts may mature more gracefully. So you are in good company. Ignore the barbs about ‘lightening up’. Enjoy the levity of others and allow yourself your own specialty. If you’reContinue reading “Comforting Thought: Introverts mature more gracefully than extroverts”

Comforting Thought: The blue of distance, the green of time

“The colour of hills that recede layer upon layer into the horizon. Well this is the green of time. The green that grows from nothing, anything if left for long enough.” It comes at first as mildew and mould. A misting of green-grey, or mustard-green, the green of decay. But then it grows into a verdant palette of new life: leaf green, lime green, the green of fresh new shoots.

Comforting Thought: Viktor Frankl knew a lot about finding meaning even in the worst situations

Frankl was a Jewish psychiatrist who was imprisoned in a Nazi concentration camp. He was a Highly Sensitive Person (HSP) and in his famous book ‘Man’s Search for Meaning’ he describes how he was called upon to inspire his fellow prisoners, how he intuitively understood what they needed. He observed that under those awful circumstances,Continue reading “Comforting Thought: Viktor Frankl knew a lot about finding meaning even in the worst situations”