The Gloaming part 1

Adventures on the Isle of Skye

THE GLOAMING COMES, THE DAY IS SPENT,
THE SUN GOES OUT OF SIGHT,
AND PAINTED IS THE OCCIDENT,
WITH PURPLE SANGUINE BRIGHT.

ALEXANDER HUME, Poet, Scotland. 1599

Adventures on the Isle of Skye
The mists and cloud come out and flirt with us and the livestock in the gloaming. Copyright Content Catnip 2010

Published by Content Catnip

Content Catnip is a quirky internet wunderkammer written by an Intergalactic Space Māori named Content Catnip. Join me as I meander through the quirky and curious aspects of history, indigenous spirituality, the natural world, animals, art, storytelling, books, philosophy, travel, Māori culture and loads more.

5 thoughts on “The Gloaming part 1

    1. So bonny. 😁 Also love the word Bonny too that could be another word for another day. Thank you Tish

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      1. There are lots of good Scottish-Pictish words aren’t there. When I lived in Aberdeen, and worked in the uni library there, I remember someone using a word that phonetically sounded like ‘fushous’. They said it meant something like tetchy, as in a child being naughty and disruptive. And that it was Pictish, though I’m not sure how you’d verify that.

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      2. Wow cool I had no idea you lived up there what did you think of Aberdeen? Fushous….sounds really Scottish hehe….I can’t help but hear it in my head in a Scottish accent. I didn’t know there were Pictish words that’s interesting I’m going to have a hunt around for more. The Pictish standing stones when you touch them seem to have a lot of mystical power or at least I imagine they do. The Picts’ mysterious and elusive culture are really fascinating

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      3. It was a bit bleak up there, but a whole new world to me (back in the ’70s). Big skies, windy beaches, and one year, a hot summer’s day in the middle of February, and all lectures were cancelled at the university. I also did my masters degree there – on farmers and hunter gatherers of the Congo, and all without leaving my draughty library nook with grey North Sea views. Aberdeenshire/NE Scotland has its own vernacular if I remember rightly – Doric. Some clips on YouTube.

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