Unusual augurs of thunder in medieval England

Unusual augurs of thunder in ancient times

In times of yore ( yore occurring around 1389) the appearance of thunder was a mixed bag. Thunder during January augured bumper crops, along with war when it crackled over the sky. However, thunder in December heralded abundant fruit trees, provisions and harmony among people.

Unusual augurs of thunder in ancient times
Harry the Hayward’s Thunder Prognostication Chart (1389)

Harry the Hayward’s Thunder Prognostication Chart (1389)

Sources: The Bodliean Library, Oxford & Weatherland by Alexandra Harris

Published by Content Catnip

Content Catnip is a quirky internet wunderkammer written by an Intergalactic Space Māori named Content Catnip. Join me as I meander through the quirky and curious aspects of history, indigenous spirituality, the natural world, animals, art, storytelling, books, philosophy, travel, Māori culture and loads more.

2 thoughts on “Unusual augurs of thunder in medieval England

    1. Hi Mike climate synoptics hmmm I am sorry I am not sure about that actually. I actually found this obscure medieval reference to weather and the augurs of thunder in an absolutely incredible book I am reading at the moment called Weatherland. This one you would love too I think.

      https://www.bookdepository.com/Weatherland-Alexandra-Harris/9780500292655

      It’s packed full of goodies like the history of the weathervane, how the Romantic poets and Shakespeare wrote about English weather, and how this influenced culture. The image and description here is taken from the book I couldn’t find much online about this image either so it remains very mysterious and unexplained treasure of the past 😀

      Like

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