Ethical Fashion Part 2: The Big Winners and Losers in Australian and NZ Fashion

Fashion’s most and least ethical brands – 2018 edition 

According to Baptist World Aid Australia, here are a list of fashion’s most ethical brands and least ethical brands.

There are a lot of parameters in which to judge a brand as being ethical. For the purpose of this article, an ethical fashion brand is defined and graded according to the systems and processes they have in place in factories. These policies and systems can either protect the rights of workers in the supply chain against exploitation, child labour and forced labour. Or, the bad and unethical brands may engage in these nefarious and shameful practices. Although the degree to which fashion brands are exploitative is a sliding scale.

The grading by Baptist World Aid helps consumers to make informed decisions about the origins of their clothes, shoes and homewares. This then influences the practices of the brand itself by exerting pressure on the brands to improve their practices. This isn’t an exhaustive list, these are the brands that are the best and worst of them. For the full list and to check your favourite brand, visit Baptist World Aid.

MOST ETHICAL FASHION BRANDS ( Rated: A+ TO B-)

Adidas

American Apparel

ASOS

Audrey Blue

Barely There

Bonds

C9 by Champion

Cotton On

COuntry Road

Gap

Gear for Sports

Glassons

Hanes

Jump

Kathmandu

Kmart

Liminal Apparel

New Balance

Nudie Jeans

Outland Denim

Patagonia

Reebok

SABA 

Sheridan

Sportscraft

Supre

Target

The North Face

Trenery

Timberland

Witchery

Wonderbra

LEAST ETHICAL FASHION BRANDS (Rated D to F)

AS Colour

Airflex

Abercrombie & Fitch

Atmos&Here

Bardot

Barkers

Basque

Bloch

Blue Illusion

Boohoo

Coco Beach

Decjuba

Diana Ferrari

Dotti

Farmers

Hollister

Jump

Karen Walker

Lacoste

Lowes

Liz Jordan

Mink Pink

Ralph Lauren

Rockmans

Roger David

Seed

Simon De Winter

Somedays Lovin

Supersoft by Diana Ferrari 

TEMT

Table Eight

Trelise Cooper

Uniqlo

Valley Girl

Wallis

Wish

yd.

See the full list here.

Also – choose clothing made from natural fabrics.

If you want to support brands that have a light carbon footprint on the natural environment, you should select clothing made from natural fibres. This means buying clothing made from silk, cotton, linen, wool and hemp. This means that the clothing will break down when put into landfill. However clothing made from synthetic fibres or a combination of natural and synthetic fibres will take thousands of years to break down and cause massive problems for the ever-growing landfills of the world and for future generations.

Clothing made of natural fibres is often more pricey than clothing made from synthetic fibres, because the manufacturing process is more intensive for natural fibre. Although, one benefit of buying natural clothing is the ‘feel’ of it against your skin. Nothing beats linen, silk or cotton against your skin, it undoubtably feels right and comfortable. Synthetics simply don’t have the same comfort as natural fabrics. Also you are doing something wonderful for the world by buying in this way. Let me know below if this information has helped you at all with your decision-making processes.

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