Food: Autumn's bounty and feijoa relish

Food: Autumn’s bounty and feijoa relish

In our front yard we have a burgeoning, blooming mini forest that encroaches on our house. Part of this wildness is a feijoa tree that drops a bounty of hundreds of oval-shaped bright green feijoa fruit onto the forest floor. I then need to scramble to grab all of these treasures before they are subsumed by the juicy, verdant ground and its birds and ants.

Food: Autumn's bounty and feijoa relish

In case you’re wondering, feijoa is an exotic fruit found in parts of South America and New Zealand. It has a granular, juicy and unusual texture and it tastes akin to fizzy sherbet.

So what to do with 3 large shopping bags full of feijoa? I boiled all of them down and turned it into a large cache of feijoa chutney. That means I can enjoy the flavour all year round. I substituted apples for pears because pears were super cheap to procure in the supermarket. Here’s the recipe

Food: Autumn's bounty and feijoa relish

 

Feijoa Chutney Recipe

1.5 kg feijoas, peeled and chopped
500g apples, peeled and chopped
500g onions, finely sliced
1 litre malt vinegar
750g brown sugar
1 tbsp salt
1 tbsp ground ginger
2 tbsp allspice
1 tbsp crushed garlic
finely grated zest of 1 lemon
½ tsp mace
½ tsp cayenne
1 tsp ground cloves

Place all ingredients in large pan and boil slowly for approximately 1-1½ hours, stirring occasionally, until mixture is thick and brown. Bottle while warm. Keeps for months. Refrigerate once open.

Food: Autumn's bounty and feijoa relish

 

5 Comments

    1. Content Catnip

      Thanks James love your feedback 😁 I saw recently they are slowly introducing them to tropical queensland and there’s a small farm there that produces them…I hope it catches on over the ditch 😉 although hampered by the fact they all fall off the tree at once which is exciting but whoever grows it has to act fast 😉

      1. jeremyjameshongkong

        My sister used to have an old feijoa tree in her backyard in Auckland. She had a crop of 1000s! Arghhh! That would be something…don’t know nobody tries to grow them in South Asia.. They grow everything else! Jeremy.

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