A friend of mine told me that she doesn't believe in COVID yesterday....

A friend of mine told me that she doesn’t believe in COVID yesterday….

As though she was speaking about the boogeyman, Easter Bunny or Santa.

I am baffled as this is a normally intelligent, coherent and sane person who gives sound advice to me.

She (along with everyone else) has been living in a place (Melbourne, Australia) which has been under one of the world’s most harsh lock-downs since March.

Perhaps (and this is just my thought) this harsh lockdown, downward spiralling economy, militant police aggression (always rather terrifying in my opinion and the police in Australia have always been known for their brutality) has generated a perfect storm for people to begin buying into conspiracy theories?

The goverment health response in Melbourne has been a bit disjointed and people have grown impatient with it. Although now, after a very long year…they seem to have broken the back of it.

Misinformation and how is spreads. Via The Spinoff NZ

What causes people to believe in hokum?

Lies like

  • 5G causes covid or makes it worse
  • A covid vaccine is going to be a way for governments to exert mind control over people.
  • The restrictions and quarantines are a part of a global conspiracy of governments to control the movements of citizens.

Are seeded and propagated by people online who have a stake in causing chaos across the world.

I don’t know if anyone else has had this problem occur in amongst their group of friends or family members. What kind of people believe these things?

People who believe covid conspiracy theories

  • Prefer to make decisions based on emotion and ‘gut feeling’ rather than logic or evidence.
  • People who feel disenfranchised and disempowered in the world.
  • People who are generally ready to give up decision-making in their lives to some omnipotent or all-knowing god or guru.

What do you think? Do you know anyone who is buying into the conspiracy theories? How f**kin scary is that, that you thought you knew someone but then they pull that kind of thing?!

19 thoughts on “A friend of mine told me that she doesn’t believe in COVID yesterday….

  1. It’s worrying all right. I liked that graphic above, from the Spinoff NZ – very clear. That part about information spreading like a virus, social media is such an enabler of that and any fact-checking always seems too little too late.

    1. Yeah exactly, any myth-busting is too little too late it seems. It’s a kind of way of thinking that grows over years it seems, out of a deep distrust of the health system or medicine in general, also a distrust of the government…and a lack of understanding of how the human body works too. I am not sure what to say to her. I guess will just see how it plays out.

      1. I can see how people don’t trust the institutions that we are supposed to trust…especially if they seem to be doing the wrong thing or the problem of covid is getting worse where they are. I can see how this makes people want to believe. Shit I wish there was some links I could send her that would just wake her up out of the dream she is in, maybe there are not sure!

  2. Yikes. It’s always a shock when people you admire for a certain area of wisdom, suddenly come out with something miles off left-field. It’s one of those moments when the Earth goes a bit wobbly under you. You can only blink, go on, sort of quarantine that little difficulty (like anti-virus software does!), and try to ignore it….

    1. Yeah that’s so right Mike. Thank you hopefully it’s just a phase she is going through and she will work it out. I have told her even if she thinks it’s not real she needs to still take precautions with her elderly mum – she said she still would. I felt bad after writing this, but nobody from my personal life reads my blog, it’s not really private as such but I sort of keep it anonymous for this reason so that I can talk more freely about things. Hopefully by talking about it, it will help someone else who has someone in their life who is enveloped in the conspiracies. At least together we can work out what to do or what to say to such person.

    1. Hi Aarti, yes me too. It makes me feel a mixture of sadness, confusion, fear and a lot more, I know where you are coming from. Thank you for your comment x

  3. Hi Catnip, you definitely caught my attention with this blog.

    Because my dad is 92, frail, and among the most vulnerable to Covid-19, my brother and I have had to take great care in how we look after him in our visits on alternate days. I’ve spent hundreds of hours reading about the virus, so that I have an idea what we are up against. What has become clear is that Covid targets the elderly (the median age of death is over 82) and those with existing illnesses. So you won’t be surprised to hear that we take huge care over our hygiene when we visit, and – when away from him – limit our exposure to other people as much as possible. We take this very seriously.

    My dad taught me to question everything I hear. So I have looked in depth at the numbers and the official statements. And honestly, it seems that that the virus is simply not the danger to the rest of us that we are being told it is. Thousands of health professionals around the world (eg the signatories to The Great Barrington Declaration) are saying that we do not need to lockdown society, wreck the global economy, or frighten people into death because they are scared to leave home for fear of catching the virus or of seeking medical treatment for non-Covid 19 illness. These things are happening here, borne out by fatalities data from the UK’s National Statistics Office.

    In recent months more and more of my family and friends have been telling me the same message: “this doesn’t add up”, or “there is something not quite right here”. None of them believe that man did not land on the moon, or that the British queen is a lizard, or that the earth is flat. But they look askance at things like the government and the WHO’s U-turn on mask policy, and the instructions to school children to social distance (the US Centre for Disease Control state estimates the survival rate for infected people aged 0-19 years for COVID19 at 99.997%).

    And then this very strange idea that governments are shoving down our throats that, somehow, we cannot return to the ‘old normal’, due to a virus that has about the same fatality rate as the flu, which has been with us for centuries. Or that we can only live fully again with the advent of a vaccine (which take a decade or more’s research to optimise).

    You don’t have to be a conspiracy theorist to question things that make no sense. Do you?

    Personally, my key find, from reading around, is that the entire basis for Covid ‘cases’ and Covid-linked deaths, the PCR test, is almost meaningless. Again, uncountable numbers of doctors can be found saying that the level of false positives thrown up by the PCR test could be 90% or higher. All of those death and cases figures thrown incessantly at us by the media are based on PCR. Whose founder, Kary Mullis, said from the get-go that it is not a diagnostic tool for any illness, and cannot accurately convey whether somebody is carrying an infection.

    Government scientific advisers and health ministers must know this. So what does a reasonable person logically conclude? Probably that we are not being told the whole truth.

    Clearly, there is a nasty virus out there. But it is not as deadly as media say. In Britain, it was ranked 24 in causes of death in August. In September, still not in the top ten.

    Sorry if I’ve banged on. But the bandying around of the term ‘conspiracy theorist’ to stigmatise people who are standing back and trying their best to perceive clearly through the fog seems unfair.

    Maybe the situation is different in New Zealand? Maybe your friend is not level-headed?

    Cheers, Kev

    1. I’m not sure how it’s the same death rate as the flu, over 226,000 people in the US have died of it. In New Zealand the full lock down and strict quarantine took it out of the country completely, twice. So locking the country down seems to be the only thing with proven effectiveness. Obviously though, everyone is going into this trying to understand it without really knowing much….obviously this involves mistakes against an unknown enemy, but locking down NZ has worked twice this year and everything is now back to normal here, other than travelling abroad. I understand why you distrust the media and the government though. I have a healthy distrust of authority as well, it is very important to always be that way. Thank you for your comment Kev and for sharing about your dad, you and your brother are obviously amazing ar caring for him.

  4. I hold social media responsible for all this conspiracy nonsense. People get themselves in these isolated information bubbles and rational thought just vanishes. Depressing!

    1. In fairness it has grown out of years and years of information wars online, and an erosion of trust in traditional media. It is easier than ever to deceive people because of all of the seemingly trustworthy news sources online.

  5. I find the “People who are generally ready to give up decision-making in their lives to some omnipotent or all-knowing god or guru” are the ones I encounter most. It’s so convenient to have an otherworldly being to blame or thank, depending on the outcome.

    Here in the US, I hear so much about freedom to do this and that are being infringed. Yet they confuse freedom with privilege and fail to see they are not ever free if they live in, work for, and otherwise contribute to a society.

    1. That is such a powerful insight Diana. The idea that we are free is conditional upon people following the rules, or not putting others at risk with our behaviour. At the same time I don’t think blindly going along with things without any skepticism of authority is also dangerous. The whole thing with covid is so so complicated and a moving target that people read that as that they are being deceived, it’s very easy to see it that way. Perhaps there’s an element of truth that, especially with someone like Trump who is a compulsive liar or Bojo in the UK who is also a terrible leader. It’s hard because nobody has the answers yet with the virus and what it’s capable of, so no wonder people turn away from the media’s narrative. Thanks for your thoughtful and insightful comment

      1. Myself, I listen to the science, to the personnel who have experience and history with this. Too many people think a microphone and a webcam make them journalists, and journalism is still a noble thing if you can find it.

        I wear a mask because it makes sense. I keep my distance from people I don’t know because it makes sense. I don’t go out a lot because I don’t want to. It’s harder for my kids who are in their 20s and 30s, but even they have to sense to weigh risk v reward.

        Ugh. What a mess. Stay well, my friend.

      2. You have got it sorted with all the precautions you are taking! Thinking of you my friend. Stay safe xxx

  6. Recently I went to a birthday lunch at the home of a good friend, and was shocked at the lack of social distancing! They may as well have come out and said exactly as your friend put it: that it doesn’t exist. Maybe it was a kind of ‘unconscious bias’, as in, ‘if we all just carry on as normal and have a good time, we won’t be touched.’ Positivity is all very well, but irresponsible behaviour is not. Often it’s just plain old Denial, I think

    1. Yeah perhaps some denial there as a coping mechanism. My partner’s mum over in Europe continues to go to the mall and take public transport even though the country is going into full lock down. People really don’t like having their set routine interrupted. Thanks for your comment.

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