Remember, nothing is permanent

Remember, nothing is permanent

Life is fragile, like the dew hanging delicately on the grass, crystal drops that will be carried away on the first morning breeze. – Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche

The indoor pool at Grossinger’s in the Catskills mountains first opened to much hype and excitement in 1958. Elizabeth Taylor attended the pool’s opening, and Florence Chadwick the first woman to swim the English Channel once took a dip there. Ross Padluck wrote about it: “The new indoor pool at Grossinger’s was the zenith of the Catskills. Nothing quite like it had ever been built, and nothing ever would be again. It represented everything about the Catskills in the 1950s-style: extravagance, luxury, modernism and celebrity.” (Photograph by Pablo Iglesias Maurer, postcard published by Bill Bard Associates.) via DCist

Do not encumber your mind with useless thoughts. What good does it do to brood on the past or anticipate the future? Remain in the simplicity of the present moment. – Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche

A lane attendant at the Homowack lodge in the Catskills. (Photograph by Pablo Iglesias Maurer, before image courtesy of the Catskills Institute at Brown University).
A photo of a lane attendant at the Homowack lodge in the Catskills in the 1950’s is compared to a photo of its current state of disrepair. (Photograph by Pablo Iglesias Maurer, before image courtesy of the Catskills Institute at Brown University). Via DCist

We must make good use of this life for the time that we have left, This brief flash of light, like the sun appearing through the clouds. – Kalu Rinpoche

More of the indoor pool at Grossinger's. The tiled floor was heated, the entire structure air conditioned. Above, beautiful mid-century
An indoor pool in the 1950s at Catskills resort, Grossinger’s. The tiled floor was heated, the entire structure air conditioned. Above, beautiful mid-century “sputnik” chandeliers cast a glow on the swimmers below. Below the pool were exercise rooms, a gym, salon and a host of other amenities. The pool has sat vacant since the late 90’s and has fallen beyond repair. (Photo by Pablo Iglesias Maurer, historical photo published by Bill Bard Associates.) Via DCist

Ours is a society of denial that conditions us to protect ourselves from any direct difficulty and discomfort. We expend enormous energy denying our insecurity, fighting pain, death and loss and hiding from the basic truths of the natural world and of our own nature. – Jack Kornfield

The cocktail lounge of a now-defunct resort in the Poconos.
The cocktail lounge of a now-defunct resort in the Poconos Mountains. A place of “peaceful relaxation and healthful recreation,” says the description on the rear of a 1950s postcard. (Photograph by Pablo Iglesias Maurer, postcard published by Kardmaster Brochures) Via DCist.

Our lives are lived in intense and anxious struggle, in a swirl of speed and aggression, in competing, grasping, possessing and achieving, forever burdening ourselves with extraneous activities and preoccupations. – Sogyal Rinpoche

Grossinger's indoor tennis center. The rear of the postcard is an ad for Grossinger's rye bread, a local staple during the resort's operation. Resort royalty Jenny Grossinger lays out the pitch:
Catskills Mountains resort Grossinger’s now and in the 1950’s (Photograph by Pablo Iglesias Maurer, postcard published by FPC advertising) Via DCist

We have only now, only this single eternal moment opening and unfolding before us, day and night. – Jack Kornfield

Summer in the Poconos. (Photograph by Pablo Iglesias Maurer, postcard published by H. Rubenstein)
Summer by the lake in the Poconos Mountains. (Photograph by Pablo Iglesias Maurer, postcard published by H. Rubenstein) via DCist

Things falling apart is a kind of testing and also a kind of healing. – Pema Chodron

The Homowack Lodge now sits abandoned on the southern edge of the famed
The Homowack Lodge now sits abandoned on the southern edge of the famed “Borscht Belt.” On its lower level, maybe the highlight of the place, a four-lane Brunswick bowling alley. It has seen better days. The resort closed in the mid-2000’s but lived on briefly, first as a Hasidic resort and lastly as the site of a summer camp—one which was forced to shut down after the NY Department of Environmental Conservation deemed it uninhabitable. (Photograph by Pablo Iglesias Maurer, postcard published by Bill Bard Associates) Via DCist

On the day that you were born, you began to die. Do not waste a single moment more! – Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche

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